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  • Devin O'Donnell

Embassy to Achilles and the Beginning of the Turn

Updated: Jan 21

Today we are continuing our reading of the Iliad. Much has happened, and we have now come to the middle section of the epic. Last week we finished Book IX, where we see the beginning of the turn of the tide of war with the "embassy to Achilles." Fellow soldiers are sent to attempt change Achilles' mind and convince him to help the Argives against the rampaging Trojans, and though it may seem as if the troop of men sent is futile, we see here the slightest softening in Achilles' position. Though Agamemnon's plan fails, Nestor's does not. His wisdom may have saved the Greeks.


Here's a prayer for this week:

O God, you know that we are set in the midst of many grave dangers, and because of the frailty of our nature we cannot always stand upright: Grant that your strength and protection may support us in all dangers and carry us through every temptation; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


Agenda for Monday & Tuesday:

  1. Prayer

  2. Begin new additions to the Catechism

  3. Timeline for Classical Antiquity

  4. Go through and listen to "Old Voices"

  5. Review Book IX and begin "Rhetorical Analysis"

  6. On a separate piece of paper, analyze each speech to Achilles in Book IX from Odysseus, Phoenix, and Ajax.

  7. Note specifically the language of the members of the "embassy to Achilles." Each is trying to persuade Achilles to join the battle again. How do they do it? By specific appeals that Achilles' should recognize.

  8. Thus, where do the speeches appeal to (or simply deal with) the following concepts:

  9. MENIS

  10. KLEOS

  11. PHILOS

  12. Make sure to write down a line from the appeals you cited and any line numbers.

  13. Read the Iliad, Book X together

Agenda for Wednesday:

  1. Prayer

  2. Begin new additions to the Catechism

  3. Read and Review Genesis & Chapter 2 of House For My Name (HFMN)

  4. Reading Journal (1/19): Genesis 31 & Exodus

  5. What is Laban looking for in Gen. 31?

  6. What does this story (particularly, the part about Rachel sitting on the idols of Laban) teach us about "gods"?

  7. How does Gen. 31 foreshadow Exodus and the drama of Moses and Pharoh?

  8. Continue reading the Iliad, Book X together


Agenda for Thursday:

  1. Prayer

  2. Begin new additions to the Catechism

  3. Read and Review Genesis & Chapter 2 of House For My Name (HFMN)

  4. Reading Journal (1/19): Genesis 31 & Exodus (continued...)

  5. Read Exodus 1-2; refer back to Genesis in your Bibles

  6. More questions:

  7. How is Abram's "exodus" like that of Israel? Explain.

  8. Explain the link between the beginning and the end of the Book of Exodus.

  9. Explain the "wedding ceremony" between YHWH ("THE LORD") and His people.

  10. How are the laws of Exodus based on God's rescue of His people?

  11. Finish Rhetorical Analysis of Speeches in Book IX

  12. Continue reading the Iliad, Book XI together


Agenda for Friday:

  1. Prayer

  2. Begin new additions to the Catechism

  3. Review & Check: Reading Journal (1/19): Genesis 31 & Exodus (continued...)

  4. Review & Check: Rhetorical Analysis (1/18): Book IX

  5. Finish Rhetorical Analysis of Speeches in Book IX

  6. Continue reading the Iliad, Book XII together



REVIEW HW:

  1. Be perfect as your Father in heaven is perfect. Pray, that you may not stumble.

  2. Bring Iliad books everyday (We read Homer!)

  3. Finish Book XII up to line 320 in the Iliad

  4. Prepare for Harkness Discussion on the reading thus far in the Iliad: Monday, Jan. 24.

  5. Create 5 questions and answers. I will check them when you come on Monday.

  6. Final Exam Study Guides to come out soon.

  7. Final Exam Sign-ups will be conducted on Monday (1/24) also



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Ajax is here pictured here an image of the second major duel in Homer's Iliad: Hector and Ajax.



Ajax battling Hector, engraving by John Flaxman, 1795


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